which page is your site's homepage?

Which Page Is Your Website’s Homepage?

Gee Ranasinha  /   Website 2 Comments

Which Page Is Your Website’s Homepage?

Gee Ranasinha  /   Website 2 Comments

Do you know which page on your website is the homepage? A simple enough question, right? Well, maybe not.

Most companies believe that their website does a half decent job of introducing themselves to their customers. However, their conclusion is often based upon the assumption that every visitor is entering the website from the front door: the home page.

What You’re Saying vs. What They’re Searching

Many business websites – consciously or otherwise – are designed to lead a visitor down a determined path or paths. There a “Home page”, where the company assumes the web visitor will land. From there, the visitor is taken to “Our Products” or whatever. The visitor is then encouraged to visit such-and-such-a-page, followed by some other page. Finally they’re expected to visit the “Contact Us” page where they’ll hopefully get in touch, or submit their contact details. A salesperson then gets in touch, does the deal, and all’s right with the world. The End.

Except that’s not usually how it happens. Many visitors who come to your site arrive there thanks to search engines. Not thanks to you. And search engines aren’t generally too fussed about home pages.

“We’re Ranked #1 On Google!”

I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve heard this from business owners (or even marketing people, who really ought to know better). We’ll enter into a conversation about the optimization of their online content for search engines, and I’m told in no uncertain terms that there’s nothing to worry about from that side. “We consistently appear as the top search result on Google, Bing, and the rest,” I’m told.

When I ask what search terms are being used to bring that result, I’m invariably told that it’s the name of their business! Once again (in case you didn’t catch it the first time): The name of their business. I’m sorry people, but if your business is called XYZ Accounting and you don’t come up in at least the top three results when someone does a search for “XYZ Accounting”, then you may as well go home right now.

Most people don’t type in the name of a business in a search engine. They’ll enter some key words about the information that they’re looking for, or the problem that they’re trying to solve. What they click on when the results page pops-up is based upon the title and description of the particular web page that the search engine has decided to display.

And – more often than not – the page they’re clicking on is not your homepage. And that highlights a number of problems.

Firstly, if your business value messaging is solely built around what your company does, rather than around the customer issues it addresses, your page may not even appear on those search engine results. Secondly, if your website is structured on the basis of leading the visitor from one page to another, what happens when their starting-point is not where you imagined it to be?

Take a look a one of the sub-pages of your website. How does it look? Imagine that it’s the first page that a visitor sees when they come to your website. Does the content stand on its own two feet, or does its reason for being depend on other pages? Are there important links or content on your “real” homepage that are not immediately accessible from this page? Can the visitor easily get to your “About” page and “Contact” page (probably the two most-visited pages on your website) in one click?

“Which Page Is Your Homepage?”

You don’t get to decide on which page your visitors join your website. That control has been given over to the search engines. Google, and the rest, are effectively deciding which page on your website is the “homepage” for the visitor. Every page on your website needs to be strong enough to stand on its own, as much as being part of a wider, integrated brand experience.

There’s no place like Home. Wherever that may be.

About the Author
 Which Page Is Your Websites Homepage?

Gee Ranasinha

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After founding a successful media production firm, Gee became worldwide director of marketing for a software company. Today he's CEO of KEXINO as well as an author, lecturer, husband, father, and all-round nice bloke. More at kexino.com/gee-ranasinha.

  • Juan Scott

    A very good point. Thanks for the info.

    • http://kexino.com Gee Ranasinha

      Cheers Juan.
      Thanks for stopping by, and taking the time to leave a comment.