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Your Business Is Competing With Apple

Gee Ranasinha Marketing 3 Comments

Or Coca-Cola. Or McDonald’s. Or Nike. Or pretty much any of the world’s biggest brands.

“But my business doesn’t sell computers, or soft drinks, or sneakers, or fast food!”  I hear you say. The fact is that it doesn’t matter if you don’t think you’re competing with such commercial giants.

You’re not the one who’s making the comparison. Your customers are.

Others Are Defining The Customer Experience

Business marketing and communication have always been continually evolving processes, but never more than right now. Over the past few years companies such as Amazon, or Disney, or Southwest Airlines have ploughed gazillions into improving the experience before, during and after we buy their stuff. It might be a clean, clear, well-organized website that’s easy to navigate through, find the content you’re after and buy whatever it is that you want to buy.

Or perhaps it’s fantastic after-sales service where you’re immediately put through to someone who not only understands your issue, or gives the impression that they actually give a stuff, but (you feel) goes out of their way to turn that frown upside down.

Or maybe it’s a happy, friendly face at the counter, letting you know that you shouldn’t be buying that particular thing today, as it’s going to be on sale next week. Not only that, but they’d be happy to put it aside for you to collect the next time you come by.

Customer Service Helps Define Your Brand

As consumers, we love being treated well. These are some of the ways that global brands keep us coming back for more. Not only do we reward these brands with our continued business, but we use the way that we’re treated as a measure for all our buying experiences. That includes buying from you.

In other words some of the biggest, most successful and most valuable companies in the world are setting the rules by which your customers are judging how well (or otherwise) you’re serving them. Their level of expectation has been set.

Billion Dollar Business Marketing

The good news is that your company no longer needs to have a marketing budget comparable to the GDP of a small Eastern European country in order to hold your own against the big guns. Technology has leveled the playing field in terms of communication, distribution, engagement, measurement, design and application.

What technology can’t do for you, however, is all the stuff in between.

Technology can’t show how (and why) you’re different, and why your customers should be buying from you rather than the place down the street (or the other side of the globe).

Technology can’t replicate how you go the extra mile – for your customers, your suppliers and your staff. Most of all, technology isn’t a substitute for the passion that you and your employees bring to the table every single day.

You couldn’t wish for a biggest business advantage.

About the Author
Avatar for Gee Ranasinha

Gee Ranasinha

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After founding a successful media production firm, Gee became worldwide director of marketing for a European software company. As well as CEO of KEXINO he's an author, lecturer, husband, and father; and one hell of a nice bloke. He lives in a world of his own in Strasbourg, France, tolerated by his wife and young son. Find out more about Gee at kexino.com/gee-ranasinha.



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Comments 3

  1. Avatar for Gee Ranasinha

    Hi Gee,
    I totally agree that global brands have set customer expectations worldwide and that sometimes small businesses are judged by these expectations too. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing. After all, some global brands haven’t necessarily created the best impression with customers or at the very least have created a niche for businesses offering a different kind of experience than what larger brands can provide.

    1. Avatar for Gee Ranasinha

      Hi Heather, many thanks for taking the time to leave a comment.

      To clarify, I’m not saying that raising customer expectations is a bad thing (if only MORE companies would make the effort!). I’m saying that the bar has been raised and, as a result, companies of all sizes are being expected to deliver as least “as good” a buying experience as the big guns.

      I think that customers are less forgiving of elements within the buying process that – they feel – are easily controlled. The reason is that they see how easy some companies make it, and expect that level of attention to detail from wherever they buy.

      1. Avatar for Gee Ranasinha

        Hi Gee. Just to clarify on my part as well, I understand and agree with your points. But also taking it a step further, I’m saying that while some global brands, Amazon for example, raise expectations for everyone, other brands, like Starbucks, might actually create niches for small independent coffee shops that are not large, slick chains and that offer a signature taste that is very different than Starbucks signature roast, or perhaps even features a completely different approach to coffee. In both cases, the standard established by global brands is important. In one case, it sets the standard by which all other brands will be measured. In the other, it uses that standard as a way to differentiate from larger competitors. Thanks again for sharing.

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