next generation email marketing

Email Marketing: It’s a Question Of Value

Gee Ranasinha Communications, Marketing 2 Comments

In the old days of marketing, the very fact that a company had a prospect’s email address equated to having their attention.

Not any more.

If your email inbox is anything like mine, barely a day goes by when you don’t receive some kind of marketing circular. We’re constantly bombarded with so-called “special” offers, company or product news updates, or sales pitches – all continually fighting for our attention.

As a result we’re increasingly desensitized to most of the marketing messages that companies send out. More often than not we look at the name of the email sender, perhaps read the subject headline – only to bin the email.

Playing the Numbers Game

Marketers look at the problem as being one of numbers. Increase the number of people receiving the communication to increase the number of take-ups of the offer. They talk about “open rates” – the number of people who view (or “open”) the email as a percentage of the number of emails that are sent out.

Since we’re all getting increasingly fed up receiving with such mails, you won’t be surprised to hear that email open rates are in a state of continual decline.

Today, depending on the industry, it’s getting increasingly more common to have an email open rate in single-digit percentages. Marketers would have you believe that this is “normal”. However, I’d contend that it’s a sign that corporate marketing has lost the attention of the people that they’re trying to communicate with.

An Abuse of Trust

Why? Because many of the people on email distribution lists feel that they’ve been conned. They feel that they were forced into giving their contact details, in order to receive something of a perceived value.

Now they’re receiving overly-frequent, untargeted communications which they respond to by ignoring them. Fancy graphics, killer copywriting and an ever-more compelling value offering now only goes part of the way.

What’s the solution? Should we all stop offering something in return for a customer’s email address? I don’t think that’s the issue.

The issue is that email lists compel us to categorize and segregate customers and prospects into nameless, faceless entities. While what we should be doing is using technologies such as email communications to recognize that there’s a person, an individual, at the end of every one of those email addresses.

Sure, you need to create and show the value of your offering. But if you really want to attract and maintain a customer’s attention, then they need to feel that you value them too.

About the Author
Avatar for Gee Ranasinha

Gee Ranasinha

Facebook Twitter Google+

After founding a successful media production firm, Gee became worldwide director of marketing for a European software company. As well as CEO of KEXINO he's an author, lecturer, husband, and father; and one hell of a nice bloke. He lives in a world of his own in Strasbourg, France, tolerated by his wife and young son. Find out more about Gee at kexino.com/gee-ranasinha.



Share this with your friends










Submit

Want to receive our articles by email? Type your email address in here »  then click on this »

Comments 2

  1. Avatar for Gee Ranasinha

    Yes, even I myself never bother to opening emails from marketers  and sometimes you can’t blame people (like me) to do so when we just hit the delete button sans even opening the mail. We feel ‘conned’ as you put it and we don’t want to be bombarded with unnecessary emails. 

    1. Avatar for Gee Ranasinha

      Hi Cathy,
      I think that most people see marketing emails as intrusions and, since it costs virtually nothing to send them (unlike direct mail) the implication of an unsolicited impersonal communication is that our value as customers is belittled. Ultimately, people buy from people!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *